Guinea Pig Flower of Flesh and Blood

Guinea Pig
Guinea Pig (film series) logo.png
Created past Satoru Ogura
Hideshi Hino
Original work Guinea Pig: Devil’s Experiment
(1985)
Print publications
Comics Manga by Hideshi Hino
Films and television
Pic(s) List of films


Guinea Pig


(
ギニーピッグ
,

Ginī Piggu
)

is a Japanese exploitation gore horror film serial that consists of 6 films, besides as two making-of documentaries. The series’ original concept, envisioned past manga artist Hideshi Hino (who wrote and directed two films in the series), was to create movie adaptations of his manga work.[
commendation needed
]

The series primarily focuses on situations involving graphic violence, gore, mutilation, torture, and murder.

The
Guinea Pig
series has garnered controversy for its depictions of violence. One or more than entries in the series were suspected to take influenced Tsutomu Miyazaki, a serial killer who kidnapped and murdered four immature girls. The second film in the series,
Guinea Pig two: Flower of Flesh and Blood, was supposedly withdrawn from the marketplace, and has achieved particular notoriety considering of an incident in which American actor Charlie Sheen is said to have watched the flick and believed that information technology depicted the bodily killing and dismemberment of a real woman, prompting him to written report it to authorities.

The
Republic of guinea Sus scrofa
films were released on DVD by benefactor Unearthed Films. As a tribute to the Japanese motion picture series, Unearthed Films began producing a series of horror films titled
American Republic of guinea Pig.

Films

[edit]



Devil’s Experiment
(1985)


[edit]

Guinea Pig: Devil’s Experiment

(
ギニーピッグ 悪魔の実験
,

Ginī Piggu: Akuma no Jikken
, a.k.a. “Unabridged Agony”)

is a 1985 movie directed by Satoru Ogura, and the first entry in the series.[one]
[2]
The film depicts a group of men who kidnap and graphically torture a young woman in a diversity of ways—these include striking her, kicking her, pinching her with pliers, forcing her to endure audio torture, burning her with hot oil, pouring maggots on her, and poking a needle through one of her eyes.[2]



Flower of Flesh and Blood
(1985)


[edit]

Guinea Hog 2: Flower of Flesh and Claret

(
ギニーピッグ2 血肉の華
,

Ginī Piggu 2: Chiniku no Hana
)

is a 1985 film written and directed by Hideshi Hino, based on his horror manga works, and is the 2nd entry in the series. The plot revolves effectually a man dressed as a samurai who drugs and abducts a woman, takes her to his dwelling, dismembers her, and adds her body parts to a collection.

This entry in the series has been called “notorious”.[three]
[4]
It garnered controversy for its graphic content and was reportedly withdrawn from the marketplace subsequently beingness examined past a number of Japanese boards of education.[5]
Information technology was also suspected to have influenced serial killer Tsutomu Miyazaki—also known equally the Otaku Murderer—who abducted and murdered four young girls in the Saitama and Tokyo prefectures.[vi]
[vii]
[8]
Miyazaki had an extensive collection of videotapes, many of which were horror films;[8]
[ix]
one of the
Guinea Pig
films was reported to have been found in Miyazaki’southward collection, though author-manager Hino has asserted that it was not
Blossom of Flesh and Blood.[5]

In the early 1990s, American histrion Charlie Sheen is said to accept obtained a re-create of the moving-picture show, watched it, and became convinced that it was a snuff film that depicted the bodily dismemberment and killing of a existent woman.[1]
[v]
[10]
He reported it to authorities, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation purportedly opened an inquiry into those involved in the film’s product and distribution, merely any official investigations were dropped later information technology was demonstrated that special effects were used to simulate the violence in the film.[11]
[12]
This incident, and the frequency with which it has been recounted by “hard core” fans of horror films, has been compared to an urban legend.[1]
[13]



He Never Dies
(1986)


[edit]

Guinea Pig iii: Shudder! The Man Who Never Dies

(
ギニーピッグ3 戦慄! 死なない男
,

Ginī Piggu three: Senritsu! Shinanai Otoko
)
, also known as
Guinea Pig iii: He Never Dies, is a 1986 film directed by Masayuki Hisazumi[xiv]
(or Masayuki Kusumi).[fifteen]
Subsequently an introduction given by an American reporter discussing foreign cases from around the world, the story begins, centering around an unlucky salaryman named Hideshi. Ane evening, Hideshi attempts to slit his wrists, and finds that he cannot feel hurting.[16]
He then discovers that he has somehow become immortal, and invites a co-worker to his dwelling, request that he bring sharp gardening utensils with him. When his co-worker arrives, Hideshi plays a practical joke on him past using the tools to mutilate himself,[17]
and then ends upward decapitating himself with a set of gardening shears, terrifying the co-worker to the bespeak of fainting during the ordeal. Eventually, the co-worker’s girlfriend enters Hideshi’south apartment to see why her fiancé was taking then long, just to find Hideshi’s withal-living head on a blood-spattered coffee table. More confused than scared, she goes to wake the co-worker, and so the two begin to clean the apartment then Hideshi doesn’t get in problem with his landlord. Equally the others become to work cleaning, Hideshi announces that he has get more than confident, and would like to return to his job the next solar day.

Though
He Never Dies
features graphic imagery, it is more darkly comedic in tone than its predecessors and its successors except
Devil Woman Medico.[xv]
[17]



Mermaid in a Manhole
(1988)


[edit]

Guinea Squealer: Mermaid in a Manhole

(
ギニーピッグ マンホールの中の人魚
,

Ginī Piggu: Manhōru no Naka no Ningyo
)

is a 1988[one]
[17]
[18]
moving-picture show written and directed by Hideshi Hino, based again on his horror manga works.[sixteen]
[19]
Sources differ on whether it is the 4th or sixth film in the series.[1]
[xiv]
[xix]
In a 2009 interview with
Vice, Hino said that he had “nothing to exercise with” the quaternary
Guinea Grunter
film,[5]
implying that he does not consider
Mermaid in a Manhole
to be the fourth entry in the series. However, Stephen Biro, co-founder of the home video distribution company Unearthed Films, listed
Mermaid in a Manhole
as the fourth moving picture in the series.[1]
In his volume
The Encyclopedia of Japanese Horror Films, Salvador Jimenez Murguía claims that it was “the sixth
Guinea Pig
film to be produced, although it was released quaternary.”[18]

The plot of
Mermaid in a Manhole
follows an artist who has go estranged from his wife. One day while visiting the sewers beneath the streets of Okinawa, he encounters a mermaid that he had once met as a child.[nineteen]
Afterwards noticing that she has boils growing on her body, the artist offers to assist her, and brings the mermaid to his house to continue illustrating her. Over time, her illness gets worse, and eventually she begins suffering the symptoms of a horrendous infestation in which endless worms of various sizes outburst out of the boils on her body. On the verge of death, she begs the artist to impale her, and he does, stabbing her to decease so dismembering her body. Later, the creative person’due south ii neighbours, who were intrigued by what the creative person had been doing later i of them found a fish head in the trash, become to investigate, but abscond after they come up across the artist holding the pieces of the mermaid while listlessly singing about her death.

When the local law take control of the scene and investigate, they find that instead of the dismembered trunk being that of a mermaid, it was that of a homo adult female instead. The neighbours are interviewed, and everyone suspects the artist to accept killed his married woman, a statement which the investigation finds to exist true; hallucinating, the schizophrenic creative person had murdered his married woman, who had been suffering from stomach cancer. Now imprisoned, the artist sits, manically muttering to himself almost how he was sure he had killed the mermaid. However, despite all the evidence confronting it, a single calibration was found in the bathtub in the artist’s business firm, belonging to an unidentified species.[eighteen]



Android of Notre Dame
(1988)


[edit]

Guinea Pig: Android of Notre Dame

(
ギニーピッグ ノートルダムのアンドロイド
,

Ginī Piggu: Nōtorudamu no Andoroido
)

is a 1988[1]
[twenty]
film directed by Kazuhito Kuramoto.[2]
[16]
Information technology revolves around a scientist who tries to observe a cure for his sister’s grave illness. The scientist needs a “republic of guinea pig” to perform experiments on. A stranger approaches the scientist, offering of a body for the experiments, for which the scientist will pay. When the experiments practise not become well, the scientist becomes enraged and hacks the body to pieces. The stranger approaches the scientist again and supplies another torso and so the experiments can continue.



Devil Adult female Doctor
(1990)


[edit]

Guinea Pig: Devil Woman Doctor

(
ギニーピッグ ピーターの悪魔の女医さん
,

Ginī Piggu: Pītā no Akuma no Joi-san
)

is a 1990[one]
[fourteen]
[xv]
film directed by Hajime Tabe.[15]
Much similar
Mermaid in a Manhole, sources differ on whether
Devil Woman Md
is the fourth or sixth entry in the serial.[10]
[14]
The front cover fine art for the VHS release of the moving picture by Sai Enterprise describes information technology as the fourth motion-picture show in the series.[21]
[
better source needed
]

Co-ordinate to Salvador Jimenez Murguía: “despite beingness chronologically labeled as the quaternary in the series, [Devil Woman Medico] is oftentimes referred to as the last [Republic of guinea Pig] film.”[22]

Devil Adult female Physician
tells the story of a female medico played by Japanese elevate actor Peter.[16]
[22]
[23]
The movie takes the form of several vignettes in which she encounters numerous patients, including a family whose heads explode if they become upset and a woman whose heart explodes when she becomes scared, a homo with dissociative identity disorder who finds a new life every bit a street comedian, a yakuza member with a sentient tumour with a homo face growing on his stomach, and a zombie with a withal-living girlfriend. The doctor then saves a woman from an breathing internal organ before coming together a man who sweats claret, and attempts to remove a living tattoo from another patient, who she eventually has to flay alive to finally remove the troublesome ink. In the final scene, a grouping of iv men discuss their particularly bizarre conditions. The beginning patient produces soybean paste under his feet and can spit eggs containing babe aliens from his rima oris, the second has an rubberband penis, the 3rd constantly emits fume from his body, and the fourth has a heart which moves around inside him. The Devil Woman Doctor so arrives on the scene and proclaims to the audience that each of the 4 conditions presented by the patients are incurable. As the credits roll, several of the movie’s characters striking each other with metal discs coated in precipitous metal spikes, causing big amounts of blood to spurt from them, though no one appears to be seriously injured despite the graphic scene.[24]
[25]
Rather than horror, the tone of this installment is more akin to extremely violent and surreal slapstick comedy.[26]
[25]

Other releases

[edit]

An arm prosthesis used in
He Never Dies
shown in the
Making of Guinea Pig
documentary.

Making-of documentaries

[edit]

In 1986,
Making of Republic of guinea Pig

(
Meikingu obu Za Ginipiggu
)
, a making-of documentary most the production of the first three
Republic of guinea Grunter
films, was released.[1]
[27]
The beingness of behind-the-scenes footage demonstrating special effects used in the
Guinea Pig
series is thought to have assuaged fears about the
Guinea Pig
films being snuff films.[iii]
[12]

Making of Devil Woman Doctor

(
Bangaihen: Akumano Joi-san Meikingu
)
, a backside-the-scenes look at the product of
Devil Woman Dr., was released in 1990.[one]
[27]



Slaughter Special
(1991)


[edit]

In 1991,
Guinea Pig: Slaughter Special

(
ギニーピッグ 惨殺スペシャル
,

Ginī Piggu: Zansatsu Supessharu
)
, a “all-time-of” special which showcases highlights from the series, was released.[ane]
[27]

Home media

[edit]

In the 1980s, the
Republic of guinea Pig
films were released on VHS by a variety of companies, including Midnight 25 Video,[28]
Nippon Domicile Video,[9]
[29]
MAD Video,[21]
[
amend source needed
]

and Sai Enterprise.[xxx]
[31]

In the early 2000s, benefactor Unearthed Films released the
Guinea Sus scrofa
films and the associated making-of documentaries on DVD. Each release was a double feature containing two films:
Devil’s Experiment
/
Android of Notre Matriarch,[2]
[32]
Mermaid in a Manhole
/
He Never Dies,[17]
[32]
Bloom of Flesh and Blood
/
Making of Guinea Pig,[3]
[32]
and
Devil Woman Doctor
/
Making of Devil Woman Doctor.[32]
The following yr, Unearthed Films released a DVD box set containing the half dozen
Guinea Pig
films, the two making-of documentaries and the
Slaughter Special.[32]
[
additional citation(s) needed
]

Legacy

[edit]

As a tribute to the
Guinea Squealer
serial, Unearthed Films began producing a horror film series known as
American Guinea Pig.[33]
[34]
The films in this series are as follows:
American Republic of guinea Pig: Bouquet of Guts and Gore
(2014),[35]
American Guinea Pig: Bloodshock
(2015),[36]
[37]
American Republic of guinea Pig: The Song of Solomon
(2017),[38]
and
American Guinea Pig: Sacrifice
(2017).[39]

References

[edit]

  1. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d




    eastward




    f




    g




    h




    i




    j




    m




    “The Guinea Hog History Folio”.
    GuineaPigFilms.com. Archived from the original on 28 May 2002. Retrieved
    xvi November
    2006
    .


  2. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d




    Wallis, J. Doyle (20 September 2002). “Guinea Grunter: Devils Experiment / Android of Notre Dame”.
    DVD Talk. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    26 December
    2019
    .


  3. ^


    a




    b




    c




    Wallis, J. Doyle (17 December 2002). “Guinea Pig: Flower of Flesh and Claret / Making of…”
    DVD Talk. Archived from the original on 26 December 2019. Retrieved
    26 December
    2019
    .



  4. ^


    Wojnar, Jason (12 October 2019). “ten Horror Movies Too Intense Fifty-fifty for Halloween”.
    Screen Rant. Archived from the original on 20 Dec 2019. Retrieved
    24 Dec
    2019
    .


  5. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d




    Kosuga, Tomo (30 September 2009). “Flowers of Flesh and Claret”.
    Vice. Archived from the original on 11 July 2019. Retrieved
    11 July
    2019
    .



  6. ^


    O’Neill, Michael, ed. (1989). “Japanese tapes: Claims of inspiration”.
    Asiaweek. Vol. fifteen, no. 27–51. Google Books: Asiaweek Express. p. 37. Retrieved
    26 December
    2019
    .



  7. ^


    “The homo, Tsutomu Miyazaki, kidnapped and killed 4 girls aged between four and seven in Tokyo and Saitama, northward of Tokyo…”“.
    Asian Recorder. Vol. 43. Google Books: Yard. Yard. Thomas at Recorder Press. 1997. Retrieved
    26 December
    2019
    .


  8. ^


    a




    b



    McRoy 2007, p. 16.
  9. ^


    a




    b




    Provencher, Ken; Dillon, Mike, eds. (2018).
    Exploiting East Asian Cinemas: Genre, Circulation, Reception. Global Exploitation Cinemas. Vol. three. Bloomsbury Academic. p. 103. ISBN978-1501319655.


  10. ^


    a




    b




    Figueroa, Dariel (xv January 2015). “When Charlie Sheen Idea He Saw A Real Snuff Picture show”.
    Uproxx. Archived from the original on 12 November 2019. Retrieved
    11 July
    2019
    .



  11. ^


    McDowell, Rider (7 August 1994). “Movies to Die For”.
    San Francisco Relate.


  12. ^


    a




    b




    Mikkelson, David (31 October 2006). “FACT Check: Snuff Films”.
    Snopes
    . Retrieved
    11 July
    2019
    .



  13. ^

    McRoy 2007, p. 15.
  14. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d




    Davies, Clive (2015).
    Spinegrinder: The Movies Most Critics Won’t Write About. Headpress. ISBN978-1909394278.


  15. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d



    McRoy 2007, p. 35.
  16. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d



    Harper 2009, p. 35.
  17. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d




    Wallis, J. Doyle (20 September 2002). “Guinea Pig: Mermaid in a Manhole / He Never Dies”.
    DVD Talk. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    26 December
    2019
    .


  18. ^


    a




    b




    c



    Murguía 2016, p. 134.
  19. ^


    a




    b




    c




    Ehrenreich, Alex (25 March 2019). “Far East Extreme: How to train your “Mermaid in a Manhole”“.
    Rue Morgue. Archived from the original on xi July 2019. Retrieved
    11 July
    2019
    .



  20. ^



    Guinea Squealer Devil’s Experiment / Android of Notre Dame
    (DVD, dorsum cover). Satoru Ogura (producer). Unearthed Films. 2004.



    {{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)

  21. ^


    a




    b




    Parton, Chip (10 February 2010). “MAD Earth: A Closer look at the Guinea Sus scrofa films on VHS”.
    Severed Movie theater. Archived from the original on 25 Feb 2010. Retrieved
    27 December
    2019
    .


  22. ^


    a




    b



    Murguía 2016, p. 107.

  23. ^

    McRoy 2007, p. 36.

  24. ^

    McRoy 2007, p. 39–40.
  25. ^


    a




    b



    Harper 2009, p. 36.

  26. ^

    McRoy 2007, p. 35, 39.
  27. ^


    a




    b




    c




    Kerekes, David; Slater, David (2016).
    Killing for Culture: From Edison to ISIS: A New History of Death on Film. Headpress. ISBN978-1909394346.



  28. ^


    Hunter, Jack (1999).
    Eros in Hell: Sex activity, Blood and Madness in Japanese Movie house. Creation Books. p. 160. ISBN978-1871592931.



  29. ^


    Sharp, Jasper (2011).
    Historical Lexicon of Japanese Cinema. Scarecrow Press. p. 89. ISBN978-0810857957.



  30. ^

    Murguía 2016, p. 105.

  31. ^


    Reyes, Xavier Aldana (2014).
    Body Gothic: Corporeal Transgression in Gimmicky Literature and Horror Picture show. Gothic Literary Studies. University of Wales Printing. p. 220. ISBN978-1783160921.


  32. ^


    a




    b




    c




    d




    due east




    “[Unearthed Films] – Collection”. Unearthed Films. Archived from the original on 27 Dec 2019. Retrieved
    27 Dec
    2019
    .



  33. ^


    Turek, Ryan (xvi September 2014). “An American Guinea Pig Serial is Being Made – Can You Tummy the Grisly Trailer?”.
    ComingSoon.net. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    27 December
    2019
    .



  34. ^


    Squires, John (17 September 2014). “Bouquet of Guts and Gore Ushers in American Guinea Pig Serial”.
    Dread Central. Archived from the original on 27 Dec 2019. Retrieved
    27 December
    2019
    .



  35. ^


    Boiselle, Matt (21 November 2014). “American Guinea Pig: Boutonniere of Guts and Gore (2014)”.
    Dread Central. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    27 December
    2019
    .



  36. ^


    Moore, Debi (19 January 2016). “Exclusive Images from American Guinea Grunter: Bloodshock”.
    Dread Key. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    27 December
    2019
    .



  37. ^


    Mr. Night (16 May 2016). “American Guinea Pig: Bloodshock”.
    Dread Central. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    27 December
    2019
    .



  38. ^


    Alexander, Chris (viii June 2017). “American Guinea Pig: The Song of Solomon Cerise Ring Trailer Volition Make You lot Sick!”.
    ComingSoon.internet. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    27 Dec
    2019
    .



  39. ^


    Mr. Dark (xix May 2017). “American Guinea Sus scrofa 4: Sacrifice”.
    Dread Central. Archived from the original on 27 December 2019. Retrieved
    27 December
    2019
    .


Bibliography

[edit]

  • Harper, Jim (2009).
    Flowers from Hell: The Modern Japanese Horror Film. Noir Publishing. p. 35. ISBN978-0953656479.

  • McRoy, Jay (2007).
    Nightmare Japan: Contemporary Japanese Horror Movie house. Rodopi. ISBN978-9042023314.

  • Murguía, Salvador Jimenez (2016).
    The Encyclopedia of Japanese Horror Films. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN978-1442261662.

External links

[edit]

  • Republic of guinea Pig: Devil’due south Experiment
    at IMDb
  • Republic of guinea Sus scrofa two: Flower of Mankind and Blood
    at IMDb
  • Guinea Squealer iii: He Never Dies
    at IMDb
  • Guinea Sus scrofa: Mermaid in a Manhole
    at IMDb
  • Guinea Pig: Android of Notre Matriarch
    at IMDb
  • Guinea Pig: Devil Woman Doc
    at IMDb
  • Making of Republic of guinea Grunter
    at IMDb
  • Making of Devil Woman Doctor
    at IMDb
  • Guinea Pig: Slaughter Special
    at IMDb




Sumber: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinea_Pig_(film_series)

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